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Sunday, December 31, 2017

New Year's Resolutions and Superstitions

Another year has passed.

It is time for all those resolutions.
If we make them, let's hope we keep them - at least for a few months.

I have been thinking about a word for 2018. I think my word will be contentment. I will try and be content in everything I do and in everything that happens.

I know that will be hard. It seems we are never content. But, I will do my best and try.

I grew up with many superstitions.

On New Year's Day we always ate cabbage, and in that cabbage was a piece of silver. We still keep this tradition, but I don't usually put silver in it.
People cook cabbage differently. My daughter-in-law's family cook apples in their cabbage.
Click here to see how my husband cooks our cabbage.

My grandmother believed in first-footer. The first one to set foot in her house on New Year's Day had to be a male. If you went by it precisely - a tall dark-haired male. It would bring you good luck and prosperity. I read somewhere that this was a Scottish tradition. We are Scotch-Irish, so maybe this is where Grandma McMillion came by this tradition.

Can you leave a comment telling us New Year's superstitions you grew up with? And, do you still go by them?

Or, perhaps leave a word for 2018 or a resolution you will try to keep.

Happy New Year!




8 comments:

  1. Happy New Year, Janet. Black-eyed peas were supposed to bring prosperity, but all they ever brought me was gas.

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    1. Ha ha. I don't like black-eyed peas, but have grown to love cabbage.

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  2. My family usually had cabbage, but my aunt was the only one who put silver in hers. If you'd known my aunt, you'd know why. - lol - We added black-eyed peas when I began growing them, and I laid claim to the south. My wife doesn't stick by any tradition, but she sometimes cooks cabbage, sometimes not.

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    1. Hope you had a happy new year, Gorges.

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  3. Here in North Alabama, we eat black-eyed peas and turnip greens (or collards). This tradition probably came from the depression years when that may have been all there was to eat.

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    1. Hi, Wanda. Hope you had a happy new year.

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  4. I have never heard of either of these superstitions, though I enjoyed learning about them. I think the only one I have tried to follow is to have a clean home as January 1st rolls in so that the year will be happy and productive. Either way- it is a nice way to start the year. :)

    Happy New Year!
    ~Jess

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