Search This Blog

Monday, October 23, 2017

Making Molasses in the Hills of West Virginia

It is that time of year. 
The time of year to make molasses.
A few weeks ago we went to the annual Liberty Lions Club Molasses Making.


 Below is a pictorial slide show of each step in the process.


 













Above is the last step. The finished molasses is piped out of the bottom of the big pot into quart or pint canning jars and put on the shelves to purchase.
It is a time-consuming process, but well worth the effort put into it.




They also made apple butter in a big copper kettle.
I have fond memories of making apple butter in 
Grandma's yard when I was young.



The molasses tasted delicious (they let you taste test a spoonful of it). We bought two quart jars of molasses, but didn't buy any apple butter. I make my own apple butter in a big pot on my stove.

It was a fun and learning experience.




8 comments:

  1. My goodness this is a fascinating process. Have a great week, Janet.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Interesting to me ~ I know all about molasses, from planting and hoeing, to cutting the stalks, hauling them to the mill, and the cooking. And don't forget playing on the "pummie" pile! (Pummies are the stalks after the juice has been squeezed out.) Growing sorghum cane and making the sorghum syrup was the main source of income for our family in the foothills of the Ozarks. Lots of work, but what memories!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Charlotte. Fascinating. It is a lot of work and sounds like you have some great memories.

      Delete
  3. I loved seeing those pictures. They make molasses at Silver Dollar City in Branson every fall and I love watch them. I love seeing the old-time crafts and ways. Seems that life is getting too 'fast' these days.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Janet-great post! I loved seeing the pictures and learning more about how it all works. I so wish I had the land and the know how to do it myself!
    (I love your May Pole in October too!!)

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hi, Janet! I just found you through Tipper's blog post about your recipe book! So thankful to "meet" you today! I love your blog! What a wealth of information you have here. I just signed up to follow by email. God bless you. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Cheryl, I am glad to meet you, too. Hope you enjoy my blog.

      Delete

Thank you for stopping by. I love comments! Leave one and brighten my day. If you are signing as Anonymous, please sign your name, so I will know who you are.